How To Iron Every Kind of Fabric: A Comprehensive Guide

 
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Ironing is a delicate process, and can certainly be intimidating when it comes to more expensive garments. When ironing, the important thing to realize is that all fabrics have a threshold of temperature in which they are ideally pressed. 

In this guide, we outline essentially every type of fabric on the market, and its proper ironing technique. 

First Step? Manage Your Iron's Heat

Many people don't realize this, but it's imperative that you separate your clothing by fabric type before proceeding to iron. This way, you won't take to a delicate garment with an iron that's been heating for too long, thus destroying your garment. Start with fabrics that require the lowest temperature - acetate, nylon - then move to silks, polyester, and finally, cotton and linen fabrics. If you've missed a step, make sure to give your iron at least five minutes to cool down. Just turning down the heat won't have an immediate effect. 

When in doubt, start low and iron on the inside with a pressing cloth. You can always move the temperature up gradually to prevent scorching!


 
  • Linen: 230 °C (445 °F)

  • Triacetate: 200 °C (390 °F)

  • Cotton: 204 °C (400 °F)

  • Viscose/Rayon: 190 °C (375 °F)

  • Wool: 148 °C (300 °F)

  • Silk: 148 °C (300 °F)

 
  • Polyester: 148 °C (300 °F)

  • Silk: 148 °C (300 °F)

  • Acetate: 143 °C (290 °F)

  • Acrylic: 135 °C (275 °F)

  • Spandex: 135 °C (275 °F)

  • Nylon: 135 °C (275 °F)


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Ironing different fabrics? Use these simple guidelines:

Acetate: Lowest heat setting. Press on the inside of the fabric while damp.

Acrylic: Heat setting 3/10. 

Beaded: Lowest heat setting. Place on a plush white towel, press on the wrong side of the fabric using a pressing cloth.

Cashmere: Steam only! Do not press.

Corduroy: Heat setting 7/10. Place on a plush white towel, press on the wrong side of the fabric then use steam on the front side of the fabric to refresh any crushed pile.

Cotton: For lightweight cotton, use a heat setting 5/10. For heavyweight cotton, 7/10. Press the fabric while still slightly damp.

Damask: Heat setting 5/10. Use a pressing cloth between the fabric and the iron.

Lace: Heat setting 3/10. Use a pressing cloth between the fabric and the iron.

Linen: Heat setting 5/10. Iron on the wrong side of the fabric while still damp for the best linen finish.

Nylon: Lowest heat setting. Use a pressing cloth for extra protection because nylon burns easily.

Polyester: Heat setting 3/10. 

Rayon: Heat setting 3/10. Iron on the wrong side of the fabric to prevent leaving a shine on rayon fabric.

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Satin: Heat setting 3/10. Press on the wrong side of the fabric with a pressing cloth between the iron and the fabric. Use no steam.

Sequined fabric: Do not iron, use light steam on the wrong side of the fabric.

Silk: Heat setting 3/10. Press on the wrong side of the fabric. Use no steam.

Velvet: Heat setting 3/10. It is preferable to never iron, only steam velvet to remove wrinkles. If the wrinkles are severe, place on a plush white towel, press on the wrong side of the fabric with a very light touch. After ironing, use steam on the front side of the fabric to refresh crushed pile.

Woven wool: Heat setting 3/10. Use a damp pressing cloth between iron and fabric. Iron on the wrong side of the fabric to prevent snags and shiny marks.

So, in recap: 

  1. Before ironing, sort your fabrics from least to most heat resistant.
  2. Use the temperature guide to avoid scorching your garments.
  3. If you have to go back to a delicate or synthetic garment, let the iron cool for at least five minutes.
  4. When in doubt, start on extra-low heat and press on the inside of the fabric, with a pressing cloth.
  5. Certain fabrics must be ironed whilst damp. Keep this in mind!

Keep Clean,

The Meurice Garment Care Team

Victor ChangComment